New Academic Year Brings New Faces to Claremont

This year you may see several new faces around the Claremont Colleges. Programs for all 5Cs—including Student Health Services and the Office of the Chaplains—have had new hires, as well as employers more specific to Scripps. Scripps has hired a new director of public relations: Steve Sabicer (PO ’00). Sabicer became the College’s director of public relations and communication this year. Mary Shipp Bartlett, the previous director of public relations, is now director of publications, in charge of editing Scripps Magazine. Patricia Goldsmith—vice president of enrollment, marketing and communication—said in announcing his appointment that Sabicer “knows and appreciates both the complexities and opportunities of the Claremont Colleges” and expressed excitement for finding a new hire with “exceptional marketing abilities and familiarity with Scripps.” Goldsmith also reported—in a brief press release that can be found on Scripps’website—that Sabicer had consulted with Scripps before his official appointment on Sept. 15, beginning his work on designing a communication plan to enhance Scripps’ national visibility.

A 5C new hire is Dr. Curtis Foster, who joined Student Health and Counseling Services on Oct. 26, taking the position of senior practitioner. He, like Sabicer, is a Pomona alumnus. Foster joins a Health Services staff of three female nurse practitioners and a female physician, providing an alternative to the mostly-female providers that had been available through Student Health Services. He has been called “an energetic and quick witted individual,” committed to “educating students to be wise health care consumers.”
This focus on education as well as service is also present in the newly-hired director of student health services, Denise Hayes. Hayes started working at Student Health Services on July 13. She has a Ph.D. in counseling psychology, an M.A. in organizational communications and a B.A. in speech, theater and communications. Drawing on this foundation of knowledge, Hayes had previously worked at DePauw University (a private liberal arts school with a student body approximately one-third of the size of that with which she works with at Claremont) to bring together the two very separate facilities of health services and counseling services. Coming to Claremont, Hayes has been impressed by the quality of the facility as a reflection of the high value plaed on health and wellness at the 5Cs.

the Claremont University Consortium, Hayes is in charge of Health Education
Outreach, Monsour Counseling and Psychological Services and Student Health. She
plans to draw on her experience at DePauw to bridge the divide between the health
and counseling service communities. Since the service communities are so separated
by their respective jargon and paperwork, the referral system between counseling and
health services is not ideal; Hayes has planned events and monthly meetings between
the two programs to aid in staff members’ confidence in cross-referral. She is also
working to implement paperwork so that consultation between doctors and counselors
is easier—having students sign a form giving permission for cross-consultation—to
make follow-up between the two services more seamless.
This fall, Hayes hosted a four-week long student group for women of color at the
5Cs. Using her background as a psychologist, Hayes invited women of color to the
Office of Black Student Affairs to learn about staying resilient, strengthening sup-
port networks, overcoming obstacles and stress and overall empowerment. The final
meeting was Nov. 3, but Hayes hopes to use the feedback from this last meeting to
create a spring iteration of the program. Also in-the-works is an updated student
health services website.
In addition to new staff for Claremont students’ physical well-being, new hires in
the office of the chaplains reflect a revitalization of resources for students’ spiritual
well-being.
Rabbi Daveen Litwin has been the Claremont University Consortium’s Jewish chap-
lain and Hillel director since Aug. 17. Her new position at Claremont brings together
over nine years of experience both as rabbi and Hillel director. As a chaplain at the 5Cs,
Litwin sees students of diverse spiritual backgrounds; regardless of whether students
are Pagan, Catholic, Muslim, Jewish or any other spiritual identity, they are welcome
to talk to the chaplains. Said Litwin: “People need to know that there are places they
can go and just be, and not have to worry about someone grading them, or judging
them or making assumptions about them. And just be themselves. Or figure out what
that means.” She emphasizes that she would like to meet students of all faiths, from
all campuses—graduate and undergraduate—and said she was eager to be a resource
and support for students.
One of these resources for students takes place every Friday at 4:30 p.m. at McAlister
Center, where there is a study of a Torah portion of the week. The group is open
to all who are interested. Litwin described it as unlike traditional “bible study” type
groups, more of a discussion of Torah excerpts—given in English translation as well
as having the text in Hebrew—and scholars’ perspectives on it. The group is about
asking questions and trying to get more personal answers than a classroom setting
might provide.
Litwin has an affection for Scripps—which she applied to as an undergraduate—and
expressed an interest in “helping women to find the ways that they can find their voices
and be their whole selves.” Women have only been able to be rabbis for 37 years, and
Litwin said that as “a rabbi who happens to be a woman” she hopes to be accessible
to all students and help women know that they can take new paths.
Litwin’s position as director of Hillel—a national organization for Jewish college
students—serves Jewish outreach more specifically than her position as chaplain. Join-
ing her as a new hire for Hillel is program director Ari Feldman. Feldman was active
in Hillel in college, and came to Claremont to further his involvement in Hillel in the
Los Angeles area. Said Feldman of his reception at Claremont: “A lot of students are
really into community service and trying to make connections between people and
establish relationships. It’s a great atmosphere.”
Feldman hopes to create organizational memory for the Claremont Consortium’s
Hillel, citing a need for systems to help with transition in the college campus setting,
where there is such a high turnover of involved members due to frequent gradua-
tions. He said that he wants to make Hillel an organization where new members can
“hit the ground running.” Feldman also plans to implement Hillel’s monthly speaker
series—Café Schlomowitzkyvitz—so that there will be a speaker each month with a
focus on a specific social action or message. This message, however, does not neces-
sarily have to be related to Jewish affairs on campus.
When asked about a message he wanted to communicate to the 5C community about
Hillel, Feldman stated, “I think that a lot of people see Hillel, especially because it’s in
the Chaplains’ office, as a specifically religious institution, in that we’re Jewish students
who do religious things and I think that’s a bit of a misconception. I think Hillel’s
mission is to bring Jewish life to people, whatever that means to them, whether that’s
doing community service projects or just being social with other students.” Feldman
also emphasized the flexibility of Hillel.“People can make their own opportunities,”
Feldman said. “If there’s not something we already provide, they can create it.”
Adriana di Bartolo is the new coordinator for the Queer Resource Center (QRC).
The QRC’s mission is “to empower each lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and
questioning person to have a positive college experience, grow as a self-aware individual
and be a responsible community member.” Di Bartolo, a doctoral student at Clare-
mont Graduate University (CGU), got her masters in women’s studies at CGU. Her
experience as a student at the Claremont Consortium and her extensive background
in queer issues makes her a valuable addition to the QRC staff.
As coordinator of the QRC, di Bartolo offers a variety of services, including in-
formal counseling in LGBTQ issues; providing interested students with contacts for
local work, volunteer or other organizations; helping students have voices in policy
matters and improve their academic experiences by acting as liaison with faculty and
administration.
As di Bartolo said in her introductory statement on the QRC website, “Whether you
identify as LGBTQ, a straight ally, a math major, an activist, an athlete, a dancer, from a
big city or a small town, the QRC has something to offer you!” Di Bartolo encourages
anyone with questions about queer life at the Claremont Colleges, or about the QRC
itself, to stop by or contact her. She can be found every weekday afternoon—Monday
through Thursday—at the QRC.
The new staff, with their excitement to meet and serve the 5C community, should
not be ignored as valuable resources. Check out some of the programs they have to
offer, and look out for the streamlined organization and waves of improvement that
are sure to hit the 5Cs.
As director of student health and counseling services at the Claremont University Consortium, Hayes is in charge of Health Education Outreach, Monsour Counseling and Psychological Services and Student Health. She plans to draw on her experience at DePauw to bridge the divide between the health and counseling service communities. Since the service communities are so separated by their respective jargon and paperwork, the referral system between counseling and health services is not ideal; Hayes has planned events and monthly meetings between the two programs to aid in staff members’ confidence in cross-referral. She is also working to implement paperwork so that consultation between doctors and counselors is easier—having students sign a form giving permission for cross-consultation—to make follow-up between the two services more seamless. This fall, Hayes hosted a four-week long student group for women of color at the 5Cs. Using her background as a psychologist, Hayes invited women of color to the Office of Black Student Affairs to learn about staying resilient, strengthening support networks, overcoming obstacles and stress and overall empowerment. The final meeting was Nov. 3, but Hayes hopes to use the feedback from this last meeting to create a spring iteration of the program. Also in-the-works is an updated student health services website.
In addition to new staff for Claremont students’ physical well-being, new hires in the office of the chaplains reflect a revitalization of resources for students’ spiritual well-being. Rabbi Daveen Litwin has been the Claremont University Consortium’s Jewish chaplain and Hillel director since Aug. 17. Her new position at Claremont brings together over nine years of experience both as rabbi and Hillel director. As a chaplain at the 5Cs, Litwin sees students of diverse spiritual backgrounds; regardless of whether students are Pagan, Catholic, Muslim, Jewish or any other spiritual identity, they are welcome to talk to the chaplains. Said Litwin: “People need to know that there are places they can go and just be, and not have to worry about someone grading them, or judging them or making assumptions about them. And just be themselves. Or figure out what that means.” She emphasizes that she would like to meet students of all faiths, from all campuses—graduate and undergraduate—and said she was eager to be a resource and support for students. One of these resources for students takes place every Friday at 4:30 p.m. at McAlister Center, where there is a study of a Torah portion of the week. The group is open to all who are interested. Litwin described it as unlike traditional “bible study” type groups, more of a discussion of Torah excerpts—given in English translation as well as having the text in Hebrew—and scholars’ perspectives on it. The group is about asking questions and trying to get more personal answers than a classroom setting might provide. Litwin has an affection for Scripps—which she applied to as an undergraduate—and expressed an interest in “helping women to find the ways that they can find their voices and be their whole selves.” Women have only been able to be rabbis for 37 years, and Litwin said that as “a rabbi who happens to be a woman” she hopes to be accessible to all students and help women know that they can take new paths. Litwin’s position as director of Hillel—a national organization for Jewish college students—serves Jewish outreach more specifically than her position as chaplain. Joining her as a new hire for Hillel is program director Ari Feldman. Feldman was active in Hillel in college, and came to Claremont to further his involvement in Hillel in the Los Angeles area. Said Feldman of his reception at Claremont: “A lot of students are really into community service and trying to make connections between people and establish relationships. It’s a great atmosphere.” Feldman hopes to create organizational memory for the Claremont Consortium’s Hillel, citing a need for systems to help with transition in the college campus setting, where there is such a high turnover of involved members due to frequent graduations. He said that he wants to make Hillel an organization where new members can “hit the ground running.” Feldman also plans to implement Hillel’s monthly speaker series—Café Schlomowitzkyvitz—so that there will be a speaker each month with a focus on a specific social action or message. This message, however, does not necessarily have to be related to Jewish affairs on campus. When asked about a message he wanted to communicate to the 5C community about Hillel, Feldman stated, “I think that a lot of people see Hillel, especially because it’s in the Chaplains’ office, as a specifically religious institution, in that we’re Jewish students who do religious things and I think that’s a bit of a misconception. I think Hillel’s mission is to bring Jewish life to people, whatever that means to them, whether that’s doing community service projects or just being social with other students.” Feldman also emphasized the flexibility of Hillel.“People can make their own opportunities,” Feldman said. “If there’s not something we already provide, they can create it.”
Adriana di Bartolo is the new coordinator for the Queer Resource Center (QRC). The QRC’s mission is “to empower each lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and questioning person to have a positive college experience, grow as a self-aware individual and be a responsible community member.” Di Bartolo, a doctoral student at Claremont Graduate University (CGU), got her masters in women’s studies at CGU. Her experience as a student at the Claremont Consortium and her extensive background in queer issues makes her a valuable addition to the QRC staff.  As coordinator of the QRC, di Bartolo offers a variety of services, including informal counseling in LGBTQ issues; providing interested students with contacts for local work, volunteer or other organizations; helping students have voices in policy matters and improve their academic experiences by acting as liaison with faculty and administration.
As di Bartolo said in her introductory statement on the QRC website, “Whether you identify as LGBTQ, a straight ally, a math major, an activist, an athlete, a dancer, from a big city or a small town, the QRC has something to offer you!” Di Bartolo encourages anyone with questions about queer life at the Claremont Colleges, or about the QRC itself, to stop by or contact her. She can be found every weekday afternoon—Monday through Thursday—at the QRC.
The new staff, with their excitement to meet and serve the 5C community, should not be ignored as valuable resources. Check out some of the programs they have to offer, and look out for the streamlined organization and waves of improvement that are sure to hit the 5Cs.