L.A. Commemorates Fall of the Berlin Wall

dorms. Currently, there is butcher paper in
every dorm with room for suggestions for
how each space can better serve its residents.
If you have suggestions about additional
furnishings or other fixtures that would en-
courage students to take advantage of those
spaces, please take a quick second and write
down your thoughts. We want the list we col-
lect to reflect the wishes of a variety of dorm
residents. Once we have a list, we will submit
it to the administration and work together
to figure out possible remedies and funding.
As it neared midnight on Nov. 8, the street in front of the
Los Angeles County Museum of Art was crowded with people.
They were gathering around a symbolic recreation of the Berlin
Wall, part of a commemoration of its fall on Nov. 9, 1989.
Various artists had decorated the wall to commemorate the
20th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. The faux Ber-
lin Wall was erected across Wilshire Boulevard, symbolically
dividing the city in half.
At midnight, after a performance from singer and  German
native Ute Lemper, the artists knocked down a small portion
of the wall, which had been made of Styrofoam. The crowd
rushed to grab pieces and continued trying to rip the canvas off
of the wooden frame of the wall, determined to get a souvenir
of the celebration. It was not until security was placed in front
of the wall that people stopped tearing at it.
Celebratory shouts—in English, Spanish, German, Italian
and French—filled the air as the public took part in the celebra-
tion. People of all ages and backgrounds had come together to
commemorate the fall of the Iron Curtain and the reunification
of a country whose division had separated family members,
friends and coworkers.
Even for those who were too young to remember the original
fall of the Berlin Wall, its commemorative re-destruction cre-
ated a sense of global community for all those who had come
to honor and celebrate the occasion.

As it neared midnight on Nov. 8, the street in front of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art was crowded with people. They were gathering around a symbolic recreation of the Berlin Wall, part of a commemoration of its fall on Nov. 9, 1989.

Various artists had decorated the wall to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. The faux Berlin Wall was erected across Wilshire Boulevard, symbolically dividing the city in half. At midnight, after a performance from singer and  German native Ute Lemper, the artists knocked down a small portion of the wall, which had been made of Styrofoam. The crowd rushed to grab pieces and continued trying to rip the canvas off of the wooden frame of the wall, determined to get a souvenir of the celebration. It was not until security was placed in front of the wall that people stopped tearing at it. Celebratory shouts—in English, Spanish, German, Italian and French—filled the air as the public took part in the celebration. People of all ages and backgrounds had come together to commemorate the fall of the Iron Curtain and the reunification of a country whose division had separated family members, friends and coworkers.

Even for those who were too young to remember the original fall of the Berlin Wall, its commemorative re-destruction created a sense of global community for all those who had come to honor and celebrate the occasion.