Flash Mob Not Much of a Mob

By Anna Pickrell '14Sports & Activities Editor

To show support for the victims of Japan’s recent natural disasters, 30 Claremont students from across the 5C’s got together to create a flash mob flag in the design of the Japanese flag. The event was photographed and the image will be printed onto postcards signed by 5C community members and sent to schools, hospitals, shelters and orphanages in Japan.

The event, organized by Ching Tung (CMC ’12), was under-attended when compared to the predicted turnout. The event, broadcast solely through a Facebook event on what may be considered a last minute schedule, suffered in attendance in large part due to the minimal amount of advertising made accessible in advance, coupled with the unreliable nature of responses garnered through that medium.

The majority of the Facebook event’s 204 confirmed attendees did not, apparently, feel bound by their virtual promises to attend the awareness-raising flash mob.

This lack of commitment speaks more to the nature of a Facebook confirmation than to students’ actual commitment to the cause. Nevertheless, organizers were disappointed to have tens rather than hundreds of participants. More participants would have made a much more vibrant flag. Had more students participated in this token act of solidarity with Japan, Claremont students may have been able to boast membership in a community which banded together to demonstrate solidarity for a worthy humanitarian cause given much lip service but little action.

Though the event’s poor attendance was disappointing, the lack of bodies at the flash mob human flag of Japan was compensated for by the energy of those dedicated enough to show. Clad in red and white shirts and spirited with an excitement to come together for Japan, participants were able to churn out a promising photograph for the project. The human flag of Japan will serve, in postcard form, as a token of community support throughout the rest of the semester. But individual members of that flag will also benefit from the knowledge that they made the initial steps in a project to make an impact, however minor, in the face of the immense tragedy faced by the victims in Japan.

Stay posted! We’ll be updating voice with more information on the flash mob flag’s postcard project as it develops.

Though its poor attendance was disappointing, the lack of bodies at the flash mob human flag of Japan was compensated for by the energy of those dedicated enough to show. Clad in red and white shirts and spirited with an excitement to come together for Japan, participants were able to churn out a promising photograph for the project. The human flag of Japan will serve, in postcard form, as a token of community support throughout the rest of the semester. But individual members of that flag will also benefit from the knowledge that they made the initial steps in a project to make an impact, however minor, in the face of the immense tragedy faced by the victims in Japan.

Stay posted! We’ll be updating voice with more information on the flash mob flag’s postcard project as it develops.